History

Celebrating our first 30 years

Founded in 1986, the school has evolved by creating new degrees, areas of study as well as growing our faculty and research centers and programs. We even went through a name change to capture it all.

After 30 years, what remains unchanged is that we are a truly global community of faculty, staff, students, alumni and community partners dedicated to the advancement of knowledge through education and research.

We hope you enjoy these highlights from our young history.

1985
Planning for the future

Planning for the future

The University of California (UC) appoints a committee to create a professional school of international affairs, chaired by esteemed professor Peter Gourevitch, who serves as inaugural dean.

(Caption: Roger Revelle and Peter Gourevitch.)

1986
A school is born

A school is born

The Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (as it was then known) becomes the only UC school of international relations.

(Caption: Peter Gourevitch, UC San Diego Chancellor Richard Atkinson, California Governor George Dukmejian and UC president David Gardner at the inaugural ceremony.)

And so it begins

And so it begins

Professor (Emeritus) Lawrence Krause, one of the world’s top authorities on trade and economic issues in the Pacific region, is appointed as the first faculty member.

1987

Enter stage right – the students

35 students are welcomed to orientation in September and form a student body government call the Pacific and International Affairs Student Organization, or PIASO. The current incarnation is called GoGPS.

1988
Endowing excellence

Endowing excellence

The Rohr Chair in Pacific International Relations is established and Professor Miles Kahler, who joined the school in 1986, becomes the first holder.

(Caption: UC San Diego Chancellor Dynes, Senator Dianne Feinstein and Miles Kahler in 1997.)

1989
Turning them loose

Turning them loose

13 students earn the Master of Pacific International Affairs degree and by September, the school’s alumni association is established.

(Caption: from left are Doming Liu, Cynthia Lopez-Ballieau, Philip Ma and Denise Norton.)

1990
A home of Italian marble by the sea

A home of Italian marble by the sea

The Robinson Building Complex opens and is named for Lawrence and Ewa Robinson, early supporters of the school. The building receives the Award of Merit by the American Institute of Architects California Council in 1991 for its design.

The Pacific is they key

The Pacific is they key

The second endowed chair is created. Professor Takeo Hoshi, who joined the school in 1988, becomes the first holder of the Pacific Economic Cooperation Chair, which is held today by Professor Gordon Hanson.

(Caption: Takeo Hoshi with students in Washington, D.C. in 1996.)

1991
Investing in the leaders of tomorrow today

Investing in the leaders of tomorrow today

The Ryoichi Sasakawa Young Leaders Fellowship Fund, a $1 million endowment, is received to create the Sylff fellows program supporting the education of outstanding students with high potential for global leadership.

(Caption: Peter Gourevitch hosts the president of the Tokyo Foundation on campus in 2000.)

Korea’s on the map

Korea’s on the map

The Korea-Pacific Program, founded in 1989 to recognize the growing importance of Korea to the U.S. and to the Asia-Pacific region, receives its first major grant.

(Caption: Dean Peter Gourevitch, Consul General Jong Sang Park, Korean Educational Attache Kyung-Duk Huh and Professor Lawrence Krause).